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The Oddment Emporium

A Cornucopia of Eclectic Delights

atlasobscura:

enochliew:

Photographs by Thom Sheridan

In 1986, the United Way attempted to break the world record for balloon launches, by releasing 1.5 million balloons, which resulted in two deaths, millions in lawsuits, and a devastating environmental impact.

Because there is such a thing as too good to be true.

Mice of Philpot Lane
No one is quite certain why this carving of two mice nibbling a block of cheese adorns a mid-19th century building in London. However, one theory that is most widely propagated is that it is a memorial to two construction workers who fought over some lunch, each believing it to be theirs. Victorian health and safety being somewhat lacking this resulted in one man falling to his death, only for it to be later discovered that mice had likely eaten the missing food. 
I think that’s a lesson in the importance of sharing if ever there was one.
[Source: Location | Image (and other theories)]

Mice of Philpot Lane

No one is quite certain why this carving of two mice nibbling a block of cheese adorns a mid-19th century building in London. However, one theory that is most widely propagated is that it is a memorial to two construction workers who fought over some lunch, each believing it to be theirs. Victorian health and safety being somewhat lacking this resulted in one man falling to his death, only for it to be later discovered that mice had likely eaten the missing food.

I think that’s a lesson in the importance of sharing if ever there was one.

[Source: Location | Image (and other theories)]

Does anybody have a picture of the piano in the little house? asked by Anonymous

Presumably you’re talking about this little house? You can see more of the interior here and here but unfortunately there are no photographs of a piano and to be honest I don’t know anything about it. I know a couple of royal blogs follow me and maybe they’ll see this and could help me out?

Abdication Blotting Paper
A piece of blotting paper used to dry the ink of the signatures of Edward VIII and his three brothers on the Instrument of Abdication in 1936. Seven such documents were signed but only one piece of blotting paper survives having been kept by Edward as a momento. 

Abdication Blotting Paper

A piece of blotting paper used to dry the ink of the signatures of Edward VIII and his three brothers on the Instrument of Abdication in 1936. Seven such documents were signed but only one piece of blotting paper survives having been kept by Edward as a momento. 

tiny-librarian:

I’m reading the article on the daily mail talking about the 4 generations photo taken at George’s christening and it’s really getting to me. It’s talking about how the only other time such a picture was taken was during the reign of Victoria and it says:

He lies on Queen Victoria’s lap — a…

When people ask me why I like the royal family, this is why. Living history.

Hello great blog have you heard of public domain review that is pretty good keep going anyway christophergeepaintings asked by Anonymous

Thank you very much indeed! Presuming you mean this Pubic Domain Review then yes, yes I have! In fact, here’s a post I made last year with content thieved from their site.

I’m definitely the best king in England at the moment.

—Charles II, after his commitment was questioned in the House of Commons. (via ieatedthepurpleone)

(via misshonoriaglossop)

Anne Brontë’s Grave
I saw Anne Brontë’s grave at St. Mary’s church in Scarborough today. She died in a nearby hotel in 1849. Her lasts words were to her sister, Charlotte, who she told to ‘take courage’ when she saw her crying. 

Anne Brontë’s Grave

I saw Anne Brontë’s grave at St. Mary’s church in Scarborough today. She died in a nearby hotel in 1849. Her lasts words were to her sister, Charlotte, who she told to ‘take courage’ when she saw her crying. 

Hello! Do you know of any similar blogs I can follow? Anything having to do with oddities, curiosities, the paranormal, weird history, etc would be perfect. Thanks so much! asked by actualsnorkmaiden-deactivated20

Hi! I don’t follow many blogs similar to mine but definitely Atlas Obscura, Weird Vintage, Ugly Renaissance Babies, and Antiques and Strange are some of my favourites. I think people should be able to comment below if there are any other good ‘uns!

Isaac Newton’s Apple Tree
My friend and I travelled to Woolsthorpe Manor in Lincolnshire today, the birthplace of Sir Isaac Newton, and the likely setting of the famous ‘apple incident’. We saw the room where he was born, and the bedroom where he conducted experiments with light, but by far the most interesting thing was the apple tree in the grounds just outside.
The story of an apple dropping from a tree having inspired Newton’s theory of gravity is confirmed in the writings of some of Newton’s closest friends. William Stukeley, Newton’s biographer, for example, wrote in 1726 how Newton told him, as the strolled below apple trees in Kensington, how:

… he was just in the same situation, as when formerly, the notion of gravitation came into his mind. “why should that apple always descend perpendicularly to the ground,” thought he to himself; occasion’d by the fall of an apple, as he sat in a contemplative mood. “why should it not go sideways, or upwards? but constantly to the earths center? assuredly, the reason is, that the earth draws it. 

[Sources: Photograph: Mine | Woolsthorpe Manor | Isaac Newton] 

Isaac Newton’s Apple Tree

My friend and I travelled to Woolsthorpe Manor in Lincolnshire today, the birthplace of Sir Isaac Newton, and the likely setting of the famous ‘apple incident’. We saw the room where he was born, and the bedroom where he conducted experiments with light, but by far the most interesting thing was the apple tree in the grounds just outside.

The story of an apple dropping from a tree having inspired Newton’s theory of gravity is confirmed in the writings of some of Newton’s closest friends. William Stukeley, Newton’s biographer, for example, wrote in 1726 how Newton told him, as the strolled below apple trees in Kensington, how:

… he was just in the same situation, as when formerly, the notion of gravitation came into his mind. “why should that apple always descend perpendicularly to the ground,” thought he to himself; occasion’d by the fall of an apple, as he sat in a contemplative mood. “why should it not go sideways, or upwards? but constantly to the earths center? assuredly, the reason is, that the earth draws it. 

[Sources: Photograph: Mine | Woolsthorpe Manor | Isaac Newton

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