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The Oddment Emporium

A Cornucopia of Eclectic Delights

Kinver Edge and the Rock Houses

I dragged my parents to see these beauties today! The Rock Houses of Kinver Edge were the last troglodyte dwellings occupied in Britain. Set high in the rock face just above Kinver, Staffordshire, the Rock Houses are said to have first been inhabited from at least the 18th century, as reported by Joseph Heely who wrote of taking refuge with a ‘clean and decent family’ in an ‘exceedingly curious rock’.

In its hey day around 40 people lived in the little community, on three levels rising up the heath. Carved out of sandstone, the houses were easy to adapt to ones needs. If a room needed to be slightly larger or a new doorway was required, the inhabitants could just chisel away. The Rock Houses were lived in until the 1960s and are now owned by the National Trust. 

collectionsofathaumatomane:

Exploring The Forbidden Corner.

I went here again today (this is from my personal blog last year). I don’t think I shared it on The Oddment Emporium last time so here it is! Weirdest place ever and well worth a visit!

Margate Shell Grotto

Margate Shell Grotto is located beneath the unlikeliest of housing estates imaginable! Legend has it that in the early 1800s a workman doing construction on a cottage in Margate dropped his spade down a narrow shaft. A young boy was sent down the hole to retrieve it and returned to the surface with stories of marvellous tunnels lined with thousands upon thousands of shells arranged in bizarre and intricate patterns. The true origins of the 140ft subterranean tunnel remains a mystery but you can read more theories here.

[Sources: Photos: Mine | Margate Shell Grotto]

St. Leonard’s Church Crypt

Below St. Leonard’s Church in Hythe, Kent, is a crypt containing the remains of 4000 men, women, and children. Exactly when and why the remains were interred is unknown. One vague theory suggests that they were victims of a battle in either AD456 or AD843 which were possibly moved into the crypt around the 13th-15th century to make more room in the graveyard.

[Sources: Photos: Mine | St. Leonard’s Crypt]

Madron Clootie Well

A clootie well is a well or spring, usually with a tree growing beside it, with supposed magical healing powers. Back in the day sick or injured people would make pilgrimages to the site and bathe naked in the waters then circumnavigate the well three times before resting on a nearby hill. A strip of cloth would then be torn from their clothes and tied to a nearby tree, the belief being that as the cloth deteriorated so would the ailment.

[Sources: Photos: Mine | Clootie Well | Madron Well]

Puzzlewood

Said to have inspired the likes J R R Tolkien and J K Rowling, Puzzlewood is an ancient woodland in The Forest of Dean, Gloucester. In the 19th century a mile of winding pathways leading over wooden bridges, and through deep and narrow gaps in the rocks, were laid and have remained mostly unchanged ever since. There is evidence of cast iron ore mining dating back to Roman times and in 1848 two workers discovered, in a hole in a rock, three earthenware jars filled with 3000 Roman coins.

[Sources: Photos: Mine | Puzzlewood Wikipedia | Puzzlewood]

atlasobscura:

enochliew:

Photographs by Thom Sheridan

In 1986, the United Way attempted to break the world record for balloon launches, by releasing 1.5 million balloons, which resulted in two deaths, millions in lawsuits, and a devastating environmental impact.

Because there is such a thing as too good to be true.

Mice of Philpot Lane
No one is quite certain why this carving of two mice nibbling a block of cheese adorns a mid-19th century building in London. However, one theory that is most widely propagated is that it is a memorial to two construction workers who fought over some lunch, each believing it to be theirs. Victorian health and safety being somewhat lacking this resulted in one man falling to his death, only for it to be later discovered that mice had likely eaten the missing food. 
I think that’s a lesson in the importance of sharing if ever there was one.
[Source: Location | Image (and other theories)]

Mice of Philpot Lane

No one is quite certain why this carving of two mice nibbling a block of cheese adorns a mid-19th century building in London. However, one theory that is most widely propagated is that it is a memorial to two construction workers who fought over some lunch, each believing it to be theirs. Victorian health and safety being somewhat lacking this resulted in one man falling to his death, only for it to be later discovered that mice had likely eaten the missing food.

I think that’s a lesson in the importance of sharing if ever there was one.

[Source: Location | Image (and other theories)]

Does anybody have a picture of the piano in the little house? asked by Anonymous

Presumably you’re talking about this little house? You can see more of the interior here and here but unfortunately there are no photographs of a piano and to be honest I don’t know anything about it. I know a couple of royal blogs follow me and maybe they’ll see this and could help me out?

Abdication Blotting Paper
A piece of blotting paper used to dry the ink of the signatures of Edward VIII and his three brothers on the Instrument of Abdication in 1936. Seven such documents were signed but only one piece of blotting paper survives having been kept by Edward as a momento. 

Abdication Blotting Paper

A piece of blotting paper used to dry the ink of the signatures of Edward VIII and his three brothers on the Instrument of Abdication in 1936. Seven such documents were signed but only one piece of blotting paper survives having been kept by Edward as a momento. 

Nº. 1 of  121