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The Oddment Emporium

A Cornucopia of Eclectic Delights

Posts tagged lion:

Doorway to Narnia
This doorknob is on the door of the rectory at St. Mark’s Church in Belfast where C S Lewis’s grandfather was reverend. Situated at about head height for a young child the doorknob is decorated with the image of a lion’s face, and would have been seen every time the young Lewis visited his grandfather. As such, people have cited the doorknob as inspiration for the character of Aslan in The Chronicles of Narnia.
Though the link perhaps seems tenuous it is worth considering that, though he was brought up in a church-going family, between the ages of 15 and 31 Lewis was an atheist. He converted back to theism many years before writing The Chronicles, which are filled with Christian ideas relatable to children, and it is an interesting thought that, whilst looking for a suitable figure to represent Christ, he chose a symbol so similar to that depicted here, as symbol that, for him at least, may have resonated with memories of his reverend grandfather and his religious upbringing.
[Sources: Image]

Doorway to Narnia

This doorknob is on the door of the rectory at St. Mark’s Church in Belfast where C S Lewis’s grandfather was reverend. Situated at about head height for a young child the doorknob is decorated with the image of a lion’s face, and would have been seen every time the young Lewis visited his grandfather. As such, people have cited the doorknob as inspiration for the character of Aslan in The Chronicles of Narnia.

Though the link perhaps seems tenuous it is worth considering that, though he was brought up in a church-going family, between the ages of 15 and 31 Lewis was an atheist. He converted back to theism many years before writing The Chronicles, which are filled with Christian ideas relatable to children, and it is an interesting thought that, whilst looking for a suitable figure to represent Christ, he chose a symbol so similar to that depicted here, as symbol that, for him at least, may have resonated with memories of his reverend grandfather and his religious upbringing.

[Sources: Image]

The Tower of London Menagerie
The Royal Menagerie is first [significantly] referenced during the reign of Henry III. In 1251, the sheriffs were ordered to pay fourpence a day towards the upkeep for the King’s polar bear; the bear attracted a great deal of attention from Londoners when it went fishing in the Thames. In 1254, the sheriffs were ordered to subsidise the construction of an elephant house at the Tower … lions were kept in the barbican known as Lion Tower. The royal collection was swelled by diplomatic gifts including three leopards from the Holy Roman Emperor. By the 18th century, the menagerie was open to the public; admission cost three half-pence or the supply of a cat or dog to be fed to the lions. The last of the animals left in 1835, relocated to Regents Park, after one of the lions was accused of biting a soldier.
Image: An African elephant arrived in late November 1254, a gift from the king of France, Louis IX, to Henry III of England. Matthew Paris (1200-1259) said of the beast, “We believe that this was the only elephant ever seen in England.” He drew the animal twice; the illustration posted here shows the elephant being fed by its keeper, “Henricus de Flor.” In 1258, about three years after it began its captivity in the Tower, the elephant died—apparently the result of being given too much red wine to drink.

The Tower of London Menagerie

The Royal Menagerie is first [significantly] referenced during the reign of Henry III. In 1251, the sheriffs were ordered to pay fourpence a day towards the upkeep for the King’s polar bear; the bear attracted a great deal of attention from Londoners when it went fishing in the Thames. In 1254, the sheriffs were ordered to subsidise the construction of an elephant house at the Tower … lions were kept in the barbican known as Lion Tower. The royal collection was swelled by diplomatic gifts including three leopards from the Holy Roman Emperor. By the 18th century, the menagerie was open to the public; admission cost three half-pence or the supply of a cat or dog to be fed to the lions. The last of the animals left in 1835, relocated to Regents Park, after one of the lions was accused of biting a soldier.

Image: An African elephant arrived in late November 1254, a gift from the king of France, Louis IX, to Henry III of England. Matthew Paris (1200-1259) said of the beast, “We believe that this was the only elephant ever seen in England.” He drew the animal twice; the illustration posted here shows the elephant being fed by its keeper, “Henricus de Flor.” In 1258, about three years after it began its captivity in the Tower, the elephant died—apparently the result of being given too much red wine to drink.

With over a hundred walls of death traveling the US by the 1930s, perhaps the coolest version was the ‘Liondrome’ in which a rider is accompanied by a tamed lion. With stage names like “Lolita” and “Ethel Purtle” these fearless women [and that one man in the first photo] actually kept these lions for pets… driving them on vertical walls for fun and profit. To have a lion right behind you on your passenger seat would be quite risky (it might get a bit too stressed and bite your head off, you know), so the drivers placed them in side-cars, and were careful not to smell of alcohol while driving - lions absolutely hated it!

Images Sources: Image 1 : Images 2 and 3 : Image 4

(Source: darkroastedblend.com)

In the 18th century, a wild animal was the coolest thing you could give as a gift. That´s why King Frederick I of Sweden got a real lion from the Bey of Algiers in 1731. When the lion died they had it stuffed … The problem was that when the taxidermist was signed the mission, the only thing left of the lion was skin and a pile of bones. This, combined with the fact that the taxidermist only had the vaguest idea of what lions really looks like, made the once so noble lion appear like this.
Apparently the taxidermist used images of lions from the royal coat of arms, which had protruding wiggly tongues and ferocious eyes, as a reference.
Oh dear! Haha!

In the 18th century, a wild animal was the coolest thing you could give as a gift. That´s why King Frederick I of Sweden got a real lion from the Bey of Algiers in 1731. When the lion died they had it stuffed … The problem was that when the taxidermist was signed the mission, the only thing left of the lion was skin and a pile of bones. This, combined with the fact that the taxidermist only had the vaguest idea of what lions really looks like, made the once so noble lion appear like this.

Apparently the taxidermist used images of lions from the royal coat of arms, which had protruding wiggly tongues and ferocious eyes, as a reference.

Oh dear! Haha!